Direct-to-consumer brands

Best practices and resources specifically for DTC brands to help them grow strong. Those brands are disruptive and need new strategies as they are going after incumbents.

The new consumer preferences likely to stay beyond COVID-19

Ecommerce is strongly impacted by the current COVID-19 epidemic. But it is early to say if it’s in a good or in a bad way. Yes, many businesses had to close down. But many others have found new customers, sold out, or grown exponentially.

Of course, the crisis is bad but it’s also a catalyst for change. The complex situation forces people to rethink their everyday behaviors and readjust to a more sustainable way of life. I don’t mean environmentally-friendly, although eco-awareness is on the rise as well, but a way of life they can keep up if another calamity strikes again.

This is triggering changes in customer preferences and shopping behavior that are big and very likely to stay beyond the current crisis. Here are some consumer trends that we think will stick.

Selling CBD: ecommerce benchmarks report

This is an ecommerce metrics report for CBD brands selling online. The most important ecommerce metrics for CBD brands included are:

  • Retention rate
  • Share of revenue from returning customers
  • Orders per customer
  • Time between orders
  • Customer lifetime value
  • Cart abandonment rate
  • Conversion rate
  • Average order value
  • Major acquisition sources
  • Most popular type of CBD product sold

Participants: CBD ecommerce brands that agreed to take part in our survey.

Method: We extracted the data from the participants’ Metrilo accounts and ran a quick analysis.

CBD Marketing and advertising

Statista estimates the CBD market size at 1.15 billion USD sales in 2020 and reaching 23 billion in 2025. And yet, working with many CBD brands, we know CBD marketing is hard and very strictly regulated. Can you advertise CBD on Facebook? We will try to answer the most pressing questions and help you sell more CBD products online.

Creating killer cosmetic packaging for your beauty brand

The beauty and cosmetics industry is staggeringly huge.

Globally, the industry is worth over $500 billion with skincare being the most profitable. Then it should be of no surprise to you that 45% of beauty videos on YouTube are makeup tutorials, or that L’oreal’s revenue in 2018 topped $31.2 billion USD.

But that doesn’t mean that smaller brands can’t thrive – quite the opposite in fact. Society is becoming more and more aware of what we put into – and onto – our bodies.

And cosmetics are no exception.

This shift in consumerism makes it possible for smaller brands with values different to massive corporations to take a nice slice of the market.

Organic skincare brands, natural moisturisers and sustainable ingredients are unique selling points that the consumer wants to be a part of.

Furthermore, the success of D2C brands (Direct To Customer) like Glossier and subscription boxes like BirchBox and Ipsy have only solidified the power of the internet as the best way to build up a customer base.

But with competition as fierce as it is, building that loyal and engaged community around your brand can be tricky. But whether you’re selling in-store or online, there’s one physical touchpoint that comes first.

Packaging.

In this article, you’ll see:

  • The role packaging plays in the cosmetics industry
  • How to design cosmetics packaging
  • Creating an entire packaging set for a cosmetic brand

Successful DTC brands: Not unicorns but $10 Million ponies

The future of consumer goods and ecommerce is not unicorns. It’s niche $10M ponies.

Bonobos, Glossier, Casper – we have heard all about those darlings of the consumer goods space. Investors love them as they love any disruptors – venture funds specializing in direct-to-consumer (DTC) brands are popping up in Europe and the US.

Forerunner Ventures alone raised $360M to invest in those companies. DTC brands (also known as DNVB – Digitally Native Vertical Brands) are the hope and future of a stagnant market. For a bit, it seemed like consumer brands are following in the steps of SaaS, shooting for the stars.

Can DTC be the new SaaS or gig Economy? Can the new AirBnB be a mattress, razors or underwear company?

Yes and no.

The brands of the future are not for everyone

A hundred years ago, consumer products were a symbol of democratization – everyday items became available in large quantities at an affordable price as people didn’t need to make their own soap, sew their clothes or knead their bread.

Convenience and the new-found joy in being able to buy things without making them led people to believe slogans like “the best canned tomato soup” and buy it in scores. It worked in those early consumerism days before society started to change faster than products on the market.

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