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3 Cool Tips to Improve Your Checkout Design

Checkout design is part of UX. And UX stands for user experience – the discipline that explores how to achieve both business and customer goals in the most balanced way possible. Here are a few bold new ideas on how to do that.

Checkout Design TipsThe goal of all UX experiments is to maximize your metrics and KPIs such as your conversion rate. This can be done by making it easier for the client to place an order, minimizing the number of clicks they have to make to achieve their goal and showing the right stuff on the right places in your website to make them convert.

Checkout Design:

1. Let customers place orders as guests, instead of forcing them to sign up

 

GoodUXHere’s a bold idea. Do you really need to create accounts, confirm emails, provide personal details and so on just to place an order? Not really.

If you, as a shop owner, need the secondary information so much, you can try and take it from the customer later, but don’t interrupt them with tons of form fields while they are ordering. This is a critical moment and it should be super easy. The order form should only have the absolutely basic fields for the order to be shipped: name, email, address.

Letting users order without logging in and signing up should increase the overall conversion rate of your store. Less forms – less friction. This means that you can make more sales for the same amount of visitors on your website. And the user experience is better instantly.

2. Remove elements, don’t add more

 

GoodUX SimplicitySimpler pages allow users to focus on what’s important. Complicated pages with tons of useless elements are difficult to use and have worse conversion rates because all elements “fight” for the user’s attention.

Try to remove everything unnecessary from your website. All the Twitter feed widgets, banner ads, social icons can go under the fold or out of the page at all to shift the focus to what’s important: why this product is super awesome!

Don’t waste precious space with stuff that’s not related to the product and doesn’t help the user make the decision of purchase. Focus on beautiful large images, custom copy, videos, product reviews, parameters and technical details.

The quality over quantity approach works here, because after all, this is a remote purchase and the client can’t really see, touch and feel the product. That’s why awesome images help. People perceive visual information easier than text and beautiful, simple, and easy to navigate pages would enhance the user experience.

You want your customers to enjoy coming to you and, just like a brick-and-mortar store, you need to keep the space neat and cosy.

3. Keep the call to action visible and clear

 

GoodUX CtaOne of the key components of successful web pages is making it obvious what the next click should be. When the user is looking at a product, the Add To Cart button should be easy to see in a quick scan of the page.

All secondary features like wishlists, reviews, sharing, etc. can be present much more subtly. Part of the user experience is being able to make a choice relatively comfortably, which sometimes is not that easy on a messy and overwhelming page.

Conclusion

As you probably noticed, the best UX for eCommerce sites is about simplicity and focus. When a checkout page design has to be made, always think about  ways how not to waste visitors’ attention on low-priority stuff and how to make the next click super obvious.

Also, here are a few ideas on how to make your online store sell more. Good luck!

 

About the author

Peter is co-founder of Metrilo and the UX designer in the Metrilo team. Noob photographer. Passionate traveler.

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